Calendar

The American University in Vietnam offers its courses over an academic year comprising two 16-week semesters and two optional 6-week summer sessions. Most courses carry 3-credit units and include forty-five (45) contact hours of classroom instruction. One unit of credit earned at AUV is equivalent to one credit earned in a semester system in the United States. Typical course load of a full-time student at AUV is 12-15 credits per semester and three credits per summer session. Key dates for the academic year 2021-2022 are given in the schedule below.

FALL SEMESTER 2021

SPRING SEMESTER 2022

SUMMER I 2022

SUMMER II 2022

FALL SEMESTER 2021

September 06 - December 22

Aug 26 - Sept 1

Courses Registration for Fall 2021

Sept 3

Academic Orientation Day

Sept 6

Classes Begin

Oct 26-29

Midterm Exams

Dec 20-22

Final Exams

Dec 26

Final Grades Due

Dec 27-28

Spring Registration (in-person or electronically)

SPRING SEMESTER 2022

January 03 - May 09

Jan 3

Classes Begin

Jan 27 - Feb 11

Lunar New Year (Tet)

May 9-11

Midterm Exams

Apr 10

Hung King’s Anniversary

Apr 30

National Unification Day

May 1

International Labor Day

May 5-9

Final Exams

May 13

Final Grades Due

SUMMER I 2022

May 23 - July 01

May 19-20

Summer Session Registration

May 23

Classes Begin

Jul 1

Final Exams

Jul 4

U.S. Independence Day

Jul 5

Grades Are Due

SUMMER II 2022

July 06 - August 12

Jul 6

Classes Begin

Aug 12

Final Exams

Aug 16

Final Grades Due

Curricula & Outcomes

Structure of Undergraduate Programs at AUV

Our programs are centered on the philosophy of liberal education, providing our students career paths grounded in a rigorous General Studies curriculum. Our sequence of General Studies courses will develop the analytical, logical, mathematical, and communication skills of students while cultivating 21st Century social, cultural and global perspectives.

Building upon the General Studies foundation, our Majors will prepare students for careers that capitalize on specialized knowledge, mature decision making, and a spirit of innovation. Graduates will lead their personal, professional, and social lives with the knowledge, skills and values required to produce lifelong achievements.

The curricula of AUV undergraduate programs are designed around three clusters of learning experiences:

1. University Preparatory: 1-24 Non-Credit courses in Intensive English language and university study skills
2. General Studies: 56 credits of coursework in critical skills and diverse areas of knowledge
3. Major: 24-50 credits of coursework in a major or minor area of specialization designed to provide foundations for productive careers

A student taking credit courses at AUV must go through all three learning experiences.

 

Overview of AUV Curricula
I. UNIPREP (1-24 non-credit modules)

These courses comprise of a coherent cluster for various levels of student English competency levels. Based on an initial comprehensive assessment, a student’s English competency level is matched with one of several levels of proficiency.


A cluster of workshops numbered 070 to 079, teach fundamental tools of English needed to communicate thoughts in daily conversations and to read and write letters, memos, and simple essays. Workshops will provide guidelines and ample opportunities to students to gain all four essential skills of the English language: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.


A cluster of advanced English workshops numbered 090 to 099 develop the student’s English skills to a level needed for completing introductory coursework at a typical American university. A student in this cluster should be prepared to engage in conversations in academic settings and possess the ability to understand textbook material and write topical papers. Workshops will emphasis reading, writing, listening, and speaking in variety of academic contexts with emphasis on writing research papers and preparation for TOEFL.


The last course is one-credit University Success course (UNIV 100) covering academic culture, study skills, time management, research resources, academic integrity, and other essential tools for university success.

 

II. GENERAL STUDIES (53 credits)
At AUV, all students will complete a strong general studies curriculum consisting of 53 credits (16 courses). These courses will provide a foundation for further learning in their chosen academic fields. All courses are three (3) semester-credits except for natural science courses. These are four (4) semester-credits and include a one (1) credit lab.


HUMANITIES (27 credits)
Communication Skills (9 credits)

ENGL 106: Oral Communication *
ENGL 107: Composition I: Introduction to Academic Prose
ENGL 108: Composition II: The Craft of Argument
COMM 225 Public Speaking *


Critical Thinking (6 credits)
PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 103: Principles of Sound Reasoning


Historical, Creative Perspectives (6 credits)
HIST 101: World History Since 1500 *
ART 100: Introduction to Art *

SOCIAL SCIENCES (12 CREDITS)
Behavioral Perspectives (3 credits)

PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology


Social Institutions (3 credits)
SOCY 101: Introduction to Sociology *
ECON 211: Macroeconomic Principles


Global Awareness (3 credits)
POSC 160: World Political Systems & Comparative Government *

MATH AND SCIENCE (20 credits)
Information Management (6 credits)

CIS 105 Computer Applications & Information Technology
STAT 226 Introductory Statistics *


Mathematics (3 credits)
MATH 117: College Math *

Natural Sciences (8 credits)
BIO 181 General Biology (4 credits) *
CHEM 101 Introductory Chemistry (4 credits) *
* Selected other courses in the same discipline group may be taken as substitute.


General Studies Distribution Requirements
The following rules apply to all five discipline groups listed in “General Studies Courses.”
• No course may satisfy the requirement of more than one discipline group (see the five
discipline groups listed).
• Courses taken in a student’s Major Study may NOT be counted toward a General Studies
requirement.
• None of the required five discipline groups may be satisfied by any means other than
successful completion of coursework. None of the following can be used to satisfy any
of the five discipline groups in the General Studies requirement: course waivers,
Advanced Placement test scores, International Baccalaureate exams, independent study
courses, or courses taken as pass/fail.
• Courses transferred from accredited universities may be accepted if those courses are
equivalent in content as determined by the AUV provost (in consultation with an expert
faculty member).


Common Quality Features of Each General Studies Course
Each course offered in General Studies must contain relevant contents and assignments that
provide the students with opportunities to develop the following intellectual and practical skills:


• Reading & Comprehension
• Information Literacy
• Inquiry and Analysis
• Critical & Creative Thinking
• Written Communication
• Oral Communication
• Individual Engagement & Peer-to-Peer Interaction


Each course offered in the Major Study must contain relevant content and assignments that
provide students with opportunities to develop the following skills:


• Quantitative & Qualitative Reasoning
• Application of Concepts for Problem Solving
• Topical Knowledge & Competence
• Ethical Reasoning
• Foundations for Lifelong Learning
• Integrative & Global Perspectives
• Teamwork

 

III. MAJOR (30-50 credits)
Major Study refers to the area of concentration, specialization or emphasis. Courses in the Major Study incorporate active learning strategies, emphasizing conceptual learning with applied hands-on experience, practical applications, group exercises, and term-long projects.

Undergraduate program learning outcomes

As a result of progressing through the AUV curriculum, graduates of AUV will:
1. Demonstrate the ability to speak, read, and write English intelligently and clearly.
2. Apply knowledge from various fields to produce structured arguments in support of their ideas.
3. Think critically and communicate their work effectively in social and professional settings.
4. Cultivate a sense of community connectedness in order to participate responsibly in civil society and ad hoc communities.
5. Connect with individuals and communities and maintain a commitment to responsible citizenship leading to positive community contributions.
6. Command a sense of global understanding that includes: an understanding of the interaction between culture and issues, an awareness of the kinship of the diverse human community, and a recognition of the interconnectedness of our shared natural environment.
7. Build a foundation for career development that provides them with the essential knowledge, skills, and values needed to succeed in the workplace as competent professionals.
8. Locate and evaluate information, understand the scientific method, use interdisciplinary knowledge, and apply appropriate technology to navigate future waves of change.
9. Reinforce and expand a system of personal values and ethics that builds a reflective framework for using knowledge and skills in ways that contribute positively to the larger society.
10. Develop a genuine interest in learning that remains for life.

University Preporatory Program

These courses comprise of a coherent cluster for various levels of student English competency. Based on an initial comprehensive assessment, a student’s English competency level is matched with one of several levels of proficiency. A cluster of modules numbered 070 to 089, teach fundamental tools of English needed to communicate thoughts in daily conversations and to read and write reports, letters, memos, and general essays. Modules will provide guidelines and ample opportunities to students to practice and gain all four essential skills of the English language: reading, viz., writing, listening, and speaking. A cluster of advanced English modules, workshops and labs numbered 090 to 099 develop the student’s English skills to a level needed for completing introductory coursework at a typical American university. A student in this cluster should be prepared to engage in conversations in academic settings and possess the ability to understand textbook material, write topical papers and make presentations. Modules and workshops develop the student’s reading, writing, listening, and speaking in variety of academic contexts with emphasis on writing research papers and preparation for TOEFL. The last course is one-credit University Success course (UNIV 100) covering academic culture, study skills, time management, research resources, academic integrity, and other essential tools for university success.

General Studies Program

General Studies will develop students; analytical abilities, rational thoughts, computational and communication skills, and social, cultural and global perspectives Our General Studies program is built on three pillars: • Developing students’ Core Skills, especially written and oral communication in English, information & computational, critical thinking and reasoning, and group and social collaboration. • Providing students with pathways to diverse knowledge, including broad-based knowledge of science and technology, social sciences, and arts and humanities. • Providing opportunities for students to integrate their learning in multicultural, interdisciplinary, and community contexts.

  • BASIC SKILLS (24 credits)

  • KNOWLEDGE BREADTH AND PERSPECTIVES (32 credits)

Majors & Minors

ASIAN STUDIES

EDUCATION (ESL EMPHASIS)

MANAGEMENT

AVIATION MANAGEMENT

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

MEDIA COMMUNICATIONS

BROADCAST JOURNALISM

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

PUBLIC RELATIONS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

GLOBAL STUDIES

SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

COMMUNICATION STUDIES

HEALTH SCIENCE

STRATEGIC ADVERTISING

COMPUTER SCIENCE

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM

OTHER

Centers

  • CAREER DEVELOPMENT

  • COLLEGE BRIDGE PROGRAM

  • FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

  • PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • STUDENT SUCCESS

  • STUDY ABROAD

  • THE WRITING CENTER

  • OTHER

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

The Center for Career Development provides students opportunities to complete internships, externships, and volunteer experiences in their chosen fields of study. These include both paid and unpaid positions and give students the chance to get a head start on their professional careers. Through agreements with many local, national, and international businesses AUV is able to offer a wide variety of experiences based on the career goals of individual AUV students. If a student’s needs fall outside the spectrum of experiences offered through our existing partnerships, we will use all our tools to create the career development experience that student is looking for.  

COLLEGE BRIDGE PROGRAM

Every year, through our partnership with the University of Missouri at Kansas City (UMKC), we provide opportunities for dozens of top students at APU International School to earn transferable university credits in courses taught by our core faculty in fields like history, English composition, creative writing, psychology, and mathematics. This is a popular program that allows students to earn unlimited university credits from a highly respected American university before they finish high school, thus accelerating their path to college graduation. 

FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

The financial environment has become increasingly complex, with more financial tools to choose from and more companies offering more financial products and advice. There is greater global interoperability among businesses, and this means there is more opportunity for growth and profitability as well as failure and loss.

Financial crises have proven that even the purported “experts” can get things wrong. We have seen the problems in only one economic sector of one country result in a worldwide contagion unable to be contained within one border. From employee pensions in the UK, to Sovereign Wealth Funds in Asia, to hedge funds in Brazil, and to global financial speculators no one group managed to escape the impacts of a worldwide economic slowdown.

The AUV Center for Financial Responsibility brings together the experience, the knowledge, and the resources to assist our participants and partners in navigating the complexity of financial dealings. Our program is designed to alleviate much of the confusion and uncertainty in financial decision making. Our mission is to establish best practices in financial management through a continual process of raising awareness, facilitating the sharing of experiences, educating, and focused learning as the financial landscape changes and the pace of financial innovation continues to accelerate.

Whether taking out a loan, investing in a small business, or buying shares in publicly listed companies overseas, our aim is to help you ask the right financial questions and make the right financial decisions. We help you understand the fine print and Terms & Conditions of contracts.  More importantly, we help you avoid common mistakes, and we motivate you to seek financial opportunities and avoid missing out on wise investments.

The first step in taking financially responsibility for your future is becoming financially knowledgeable. The AUV Center for Financial Responsibility helps you get there.
 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

We provide a multitude of opportunities for our faculty and staff to attend seminars, classes, and conferences to help expand their skillsets and advance their career goals. We also sponsor campus visits by experts in academic and nonacademic fields. We encourage faculty and students to interact with these experts through seminars, small group workshops, question and answer sessions, and classroom visits.   

STUDENT SUCCESS

AUV’s Center for Student Success supports the academic and social needs of students throughout their university experience. Academic advisors, peers, and university faculty work hand-in-hand to ensure the well-being of every student at AUV. This is a vital component of our holistic approach to education. Student activities, field trips, and accommodation for needs of our students outside of the classroom all fall under the purview of the Center for Student Success.   

STUDY ABROAD

Through agreements with our partner universities in the US, we are able to provide opportunities for AUV students to study abroad, and we are able to provide opportunities for students at partner universities to study at AUV. These cultural exchanges allow all students to expand their knowledge of the world’s cultures, societies, and business practices. Depending on the preferences and time constraints of individual students, study abroad experiences can be short (1-2 weeks) or of longer duration (1-2 semesters).  

THE WRITING CENTER

The Writing Studio is an integral part of student life at the American University in Vietnam. Located in Room 201, the Writing Center accepts both scheduled and walk-in appointments from students wanting help with any writing or research related issue. Writing centers are common at every major American university, and as AUV is an American university we think it is important for students at AUV to have access to the same resources you would have if you were in the USA. The Writing Center offers three types of services: writing services, research services, and a Writing Center website. 

OTHER

 

Policies

General Studies Distribution Requirements

The following rules apply to all five discipline groups listed in “General Studies Courses.”

  • No course may satisfy the requirement of more than one discipline group (see the five discipline groups listed).

  • Courses taken in a student’s Major Study may NOT be counted toward a General Studies requirement.

  • None of the required five discipline groups may be satisfied by any means other than successful completion of coursework. None of the following can be used to satisfy any of the five discipline groups in the General Studies requirement: course waivers, Advanced Placement test scores, International Baccalaureate exams, independent study courses, or courses taken as pass/fail.

  • Courses transferred from accredited universities may be accepted if those courses are equivalent in content as determined by the AUV provost (in consultation with an expert faculty member).

Common Quality Features of Each General Studies Course

Each course offered in General Studies must contain relevant contents and assignments that provide the students with opportunities to develop the following intellectual and practical skills:

  • Reading & Comprehension

  • Information Literacy

  • Inquiry and Analysis

  • Critical & Creative Thinking

  • Written Communication

  • Oral Communication

  • Individual Engagement & Peer-to-Peer Interaction

Each course offered in the Major Study must contain relevant content and assignments that provide students with opportunities to develop the following skills:

  • Topical Knowledge

  • Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches

  • Research and Presentation

  • Application of Concepts for Problem Solving

  • Both Individual Work and Teamwork

  • Ethical Issues (as relate to the field of study)

  • Global Perspectives

  • Foundations for Lifelong Learning

Course Descriptions

These courses comprise of a coherent cluster for various levels of student English competency. Based on an initial comprehensive assessment, a student’s English competency level is matched with one of several levels of proficiency.

A cluster of modules numbered 070 to 089, teach fundamental tools of English needed to communicate thoughts in daily conversations and to read and write reports, letters, memos, and general essays. Modules will provide guidelines and ample opportunities to students to practice and gain all four essential skills of the English language: reading, viz., writing, listening, and speaking.

A cluster of advanced English modules, workshops and labs numbered 090 to 099 develop the student’s English skills to a level needed for completing introductory coursework at a typical American university. A student in this cluster should be prepared to engage in conversations in academic settings and possess the ability to understand textbook material, write topical papers and make presentations. Modules and workshops develop the student’s reading, writing, listening, and speaking in variety of academic contexts with emphasis on writing research papers and preparation for TOEFL.