General Education

Foundational courses required for every degree program

* with the approval of the advisor certain courses under each component area may be substituted with an appropriate elective, directed study or other course

This course introduces students to the form and content of communication, including: the linguistic, psychological, and cultural bases of communication, various types of communication ranging from basic speech acts to forms of persuasion and conflict resolution, the social and political significance of communication, and howcommunication operates within and across a wide range of social contacts.

This course focuses on the process of composing thesis-driven expository essays, which helps students develop an awareness of the rhetorical situation and improve their ability to read, write, and think critically.By reading classic, contemporary essays, short fictions, and reviewing the conventions of standard English, students will work to develop their writing skills which will be illustrated by the presence of effective analysis, structure, evidence (based on research, when appropriate), and standard conventions in the essays they produce for the course.

This course is structured to review and identify the ingredient of good reasoning and how to apply it in our daily and social activities.  Current ecumenical, social, political, and environmental challenges will be analyzed and discussed.  The course readings will help students focus on “knowing how” rather than “knowing that” and will provide students with an understanding of how a logical thread runs and connect philosophical reasoning and our cultural beliefs.

This course introduces some of the basic concepts and ideas of physical science and demonstrates how they are applicable to every day processes and devices in the world. Students will learn conceptually the basis for various subjects within the physical sciences (thermodynamics, energy conservation, electricity, matter and atoms) and how to solve simple problems dealing with these subjects.This course specifically focuses on unifying the scientific concept of energy, including where it resides, and how it is transferred.The subjects discussed will require some mathematics (algebra and graphing); however, the focus will be on conceptual understanding.

This course provides an overview of biology and how it applies to everyday life. Topics covered include cell structure and function, scientific method, evolution, genetics, ecology, molecular biology, and other areas.

As a survey course, the content will provide students a foundation in basic Earth Science concepts to include rocks, minerals, plate tectonics, water cycle, geology, geologic time, Oceanography, astronomy, and political aspects of Earth Science.The main goal of this course is for students to gain an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic processes and inter-related systems that exist within Earth Science.

This course introduces students to many of the basic qualitative models and principles in chemistry.The areas covered include: basic nuclear and atomic structure, the periodic table, covalent and ionic bonding, and states of matter, intermolecular forces, energy changes, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, stoichiometry, properties of gases, and chemical properties of the common elements.The laboratory experiments and projects are designed to complement lecture material and provide real-life applications of chemistry in society.

This course is designed to satisfy the mathematics requirement for students in non-science fields.Course content includes units on sets, logic, numeration and mathematical systems, whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, and elements of number theory.

This course introduces students to four elements of cinema: categories of film (i.e., genre, foreign, silent, mainstream, abstract), organizing structures of film (i.e., narration, composition, sound, editing, dramatization), theories used to “read” films (i.e., psychoanalysis, semiotics, cultural studies), and production issues (i.e., storyboarding, shooting, lighting, editing, sound mixing). Students will also be required to produce a short video for the course.This course introduces students to four elements of cinema: categories of film (i.e., genre, foreign, silent, mainstream, abstract), organizing structures of film (i.e., narration, composition, sound, editing, dramatization), theories used to “read” films (i.e., psychoanalysis, semiotics, cultural studies), and production issues (i.e., storyboarding, shooting, lighting, editing, sound mixing). Students will also be required to produce a short video for the course.

Music 120 is a comparative study of various musical styles and cultures.Emphasis will be on basic music materials, how music is constructed and performed, and the social and cultural milieu in which it is created.This includes concert, folk, and popular music from Western Europe, America, Indonesia, North India, Japan, and West Africa, among others.Through listening and analysis, students will learn the fundamentals of music and search for the relationships and commonalities among musical cultures.

This course offers students a broad survey of the basic components of theatre, in which students will study theatre from a number of different perspectives.Students will examine four main divisions, including: plays, the history of theatre as an art, acting, technical theatre, theatre’s impact on society, and important practitioners in the field.

This course surveys the history of the world from the early river-valley civilization to 1500. Emphasis on Afro-Eurasia and the Americas subject matter includes politics, society, religion and global interactions.

This course covers world history from 1500 to the present and introduces students to historical ways of thinking.As a course introducing the humanities to students, it also reveals different manifestations of the human intelligence and imagination, as expressed in various places and times.This course proceeds thematically and introduces students to major questions and changes in the past.Instead of focusing only on what has happened in human history, students will learn to think about why and how things happen.

This course is designed to help broaden students’ understanding of historical process and the situation within the United States today.It deals with the social and political events underlying and creating the changes taking place in the U.S., in which students will attempt to understand the major events of the past through a variety of social-economic vantage points.

This course is a survey of the development and the changing historical interpretation of institutions and society in the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present. This course pays special attention to the interplay among races, cultural diversity, and conflict. Some of the themes include immigration, constitutional development politics, economics, religion, reform and the growth of the U.S as a world power, status of women, westward expansion, and urbanization.

This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the processes and results of the scientific psychological study of behavior.

This course provides a broad overview of sociology and how it applies to everyday life. Major theoretical perspectives and concepts are presented, including sociological imagination, culture, deviance, inequality, social change, and social structure.Students will also explore the influence of social class and social institutions, such as churches, education, healthcare, government, economy, and environment.The family as a social structure is also examined.

This course introduces students to the economics perspective. This powerful mode of analysis can be used to gain understanding of many phenomena, some of which may not be conventionally economic in nature; the domain of economic analysis can extend beyond traditional economical phenomena. This course largely focuses on the macro economy, i.e. the performance of the economy as a whole, by examining the economic actors (businesses, government, households) and their interactions within the various economic institutions (private and public sectors).

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Organization and presentation of data, averages and variations, elementary probability, random variables, special discrete distributions, normal distributions, sampling distributions, point estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing.